Thursday, September 15, 2005

Six Things You Might Not Have Known About The Civil War

1) More casualties resulted from dysentary and diarhea than from combat. This was primarily from soldiers using the same stream/creek for sewage and drinking water.
2) Lincoln never wanted the war to be about emancipation. He was far more concerned about maintaining the union. Only when the war was deemed close to victory did he release the emancipation proclamation. Simply put, he thought that making slavery an issue during the war would dilute union support and jeapordize the effort against the confederacy.
3) The Civil War was fought in more than 10,000 different places, including as far west as New Mexico. Texas was part of the confederacy, although today, most people don't consider it part of the south.
4) The movie "Glory" with Matthew Broderick and Morgan Freeman was based on fact. In fact, the movie is apparently a pretty good portrayal of what actually happened. Many blacks fought for the union. Blacks fighting for the union were often killed by the south instead of taken prisoner, or taken back to the south as slaves.
5) The crater scene in the movie "Cold Mountain" is accurate - that actually happened. Union soldiers dug a trench underneath confederate lines and put a bunch of explosives in. When they blew it up, a huge crater was made in the confederate lines. However, the union soldiers waited over an hour before attacking, and when they did, they got trapped in the steep walls of the crater - going in, rather than around. They were slaughtered wholesale.
6) One of the great conundrums that have baffled historians considers the origins of the civil war. Both Washington and Jefferson were outspoken critics of slaver, but both kept many slaves. There are actually several instances of these strange contradiction amongst the founding fathers. There are many theories that abound, mine is that these men simply separated theory from practice - and I mean that in a negative way. I think that in theory, these men hated and detested the concept of slavery, but in practice, kept slaves in order to preserve their wealth and property. It is, however, one of the great American curiosities that the man who wrote that "all men are created equal" was a slave owner.

4 Comments:

At September 15, 2005 at 11:30 AM, Blogger blogwriter said...

Just visiting

I have a T-Mobile Camera Cell Phones site. It has T-Mobile Camera Cell Phones stuff.

Come visit when you have time

 
At September 15, 2005 at 9:34 PM, Blogger josmom78 said...

Yes, you should definitely take advantage of that T-mobile cell thing.

That's a very good piece. Very interesting

 
At September 15, 2005 at 9:34 PM, Blogger josmom78 said...

Yes, you should definitely take advantage of that T-mobile cell thing.

That's a very good piece. Very interesting

 
At February 13, 2006 at 9:30 AM, Blogger josmom78 said...

Here is the book list from my East-Asian War class that might be interesting to you:

The Origins of the Second World War in Asia and the Pacific by Akira Iriye. A dense blow by blow of Japanese involvement in events leading up to World War II, starting from China in 1937.

A Battle History of the Imperial Japanese Navy (1941-1945) by Paul S. Dull.

Nan yo: The Rise and Fall of the Japanese in Micronesia, 1885-1945 by Mark R. Peattie

Japan at War: An Oral History by Haruko Taya Cook and Theodore F. Cook. A collection of personal accounts -- the war from an individual perspective.

In the Service of the Emperor: Essays on the Imperial Japanese Army by Edward J. Drea

 

Post a Comment

<< Home